Answers

As coach training is a commitment, questions arise for those considering learning this new communication language.  The trainers have gathered some of the questions we are asked and I, Denslow, have answered them here. 

Questions?  If you have a specific question or would like to gain a fuller understanding of the potential of coaching and the power of this training program through conversation, please reach out.  The Contact Page is one way to connect – and the link at the bottom of this page allows you make an appointment to speak with Denslow

 

Thinking about working with an organizer, organizer coach, or ADHD coach?

Please download this PDF:

Interviewing an Organizer Coach or ADHD Coach

Coaching Skills – and Organizer Coaching

What is coaching?  What are coaching skills?

Is your program ICF accredited?

How will coaching skills help me become a more successful organizer?

If there is such a big difference between the two roles (organizer and coach), then how do you combine them?  Is that what you offer in your training?

Can Organizer Coaching be done as virtual organizing over the phone and internet? 

Training Content & Commitment

How does a skill building call work?

How many classes can I miss and still get a course completion certificate?

What’s the time commitment for each course?

Can I speak with someone who has completed the training?

Can I see the training material before enrolling?

Applying for the Training

How much organizing experience do I need to apply for the training?

Do I have to be a member of NAPO, POC or ICD to apply? 

Training Costs

What payment plan options do you offer?

Is the practicum fee in addition to the coursework?  I saw the breakdown but am a little confused.

Do you offer scholarships or tuition assistance?

Training Completion & Continuing Educations Credits

May I call myself a coach after taking the Coaching Skills I class? 

May I call myself a coach after graduating from the full training? 

How many of the Coach Approach for Organizers™ training hours count toward my ICD or BCPO recertification requirements? 

How many training hours count for ICF (International Coach Federation) or ADD coach credentialing?  Are the training hours pre-approved or accredited? 

 

Coaching Skills – and Organizer Coaching

Q:  What is coaching?  What are coaching skills?

At the Coach Approach for Organizers we subscribe to the International Coach Federation’s (ICF) definition of coaching. The ICF is the only “independent, globally-recognized accrediting organization for coaches” and has more than 20,000 members worldwide. The ICF defines coaching as “partnering with clients in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires them to maximize their personal and professional potential, which is particularly important in today’s uncertain and complex environment. Coaches honor the client as the expert in his or her life and work and believe every client is creative, resourceful and whole. Standing on this foundation, the coach's responsibility is to:

  • Discover, clarify, and align with what the client wants to achieve
  • Encourage client self-discovery
  • Elicit client-generated solutions and strategies
  • Hold the client responsible and accountable

This process helps clients dramatically improve their outlook on work and life, while improving their leadership skills and unlocking their potential.

You can get an idea of the types of skills used in coaching by reviewing the ICF’s Core Competencies

We also subscribe to and teach from the PAAC (Professional Association of ADHD Coaches) list of core competencies. They are compatible with ICF’s but make some great distinctions for ADHD coaching.

Q: Is your program ICF accredited?

ACTP logoIn 2015 we were approved by the International Coaching Federation (ICF) with their highest recognition: Accredited Coach Training Program (ACTP) status. We were pleased that every minute of coach training we had created to that point was approved, signifying the arrival of the distinct specialty of organizer coaching in the field of coaching. 

Our training was accredited by ICF because we meet – we have always made a point of exceeding – ICF’s training standards.  As a result, our students have used Coach Approach training credits in their ICF credentialing applications successfully.  With formal ICF accreditation, the transcripts of all previous Coach Approach students (back to 2008) have been revised to reflect retroactive credit for completing ACTP training (per ICF instructions).

Q:  How will coaching skills help me become a more successful organizer?

A: There are many valuable skills and strengths that tend to be characteristic of a professional organizer:  a helpful nature, clarity about physical and time reality, experience in seeing options and evaluating choices, an ability to provide opinions on the best course of action, problem solving know-how, physical energy and follow-through.  With organizer training and experience, organizers also develop wisdom about organizing challenges and about people. 

Ironically, there are times when offering these skills and strengths can be counter-productive for the client even though the client is asking us for our expertise.   Organizing as it is often practiced now is apt to include these elements:

  • Rescuing the client
  • Reinforcing the client’s sense of impairment or disability in organizing matters     
  • Carrying (or taking over) the client’s motivation                            
  • Showing up as “The Expert” and inadvertently taking from the client the opportunity to learn to develop an expertise about their own needs, their own best choices, and their own best actions.

What coaching offers are the skills to create the space and confidence in the client to become a fully active collaborator.  You will be able to engage your clients fully in developing decision-making skills and in designing, using and evaluating sustainable organizing solutions, systems and strategies – including maintenance strategies. 

Organizers who are also trained coaches have learned that it is more effective to become “bi-lingual” in their skills.  They do this by offering organizing stamina, assistance and expertise while creating an environment where the client can identify how their own strengths, values, and needs impact the functioning of their day-to-day lives, the use and storage of their information and belongings and the longer term creation of a life that suits them fully. 

Q:  If there is such a big difference between the two roles (organizer and coach), then how do you combine them?  Is that what you offer in your training?

A:  The two roles (organizer and coach) are extremely compatible but can be quite different in their underlying assumptions.  A brief and possibly simplistic explanation is that an organizer comes to the client offering their problem-solving expertise, while a coach offers the client a process to discover their own answers and strengths.  Nonetheless these are two powerful and not contradictory skill sets to combine in the service of a client.  Moving between them and choosing which to work from in a given moment or situation does take training and practice.  Learning coaching skills and coaching philosophy and how to integrate coaching into organizing work is the terrain of the training we offer. 

Q:  Can Organizer Coaching be done as virtual organizing over the phone and internet? 

A: Yes, it can, absolutely.  Most coaching is done by phone with email support.  Although the training quite thoroughly addresses the use of coaching skills within an organizing session, “stand-alone coaching” (coaching which is independent of any organizing session) is also covered in our training.

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Training Content & Commitment

Q: How does a skills building call work?

A:  A skills building call consists of a group of three students.  Most skills building call assignments require each student to take on the role of Coach, Client, and Observer, so that everyone has the opportunity to experience being a client getting coached, and coaching a client.  The observer keeps track of time and provides feedback on skills used by the coach.  Skills Building Reports are filled out by each student at the end of each call.

Technically, the call is conducted through a conference call service (there are several free ones available). Each student makes a long distance call into a specific number, and one student is responsible for recording the call (a feature available through the service).  After the call, it is possible to listen to the recorded call and/or download it as an audio file.

Q:  How many classes can I miss and still get a course completion certificate?

A:  It’s our expectation that students will attend all classes unless they have an emergency or other unavoidable conflict.  Class participation is integral to the training. All classes are recorded for student review and to accommodate students when they must miss a class.

The practice groups, which are part of almost every course, are mandatory.  The members of each 3-person group count on classmate participation to complete their work.  This practice is essential to develop coaching competence.

If a student who has to miss class keeps up with the recordings and course work we can issue a completion certificate.

Q:  What’s the time commitment for each course?

A:  Each foundation course includes 90 minutes of teleclass training and 90 minutes of small group (skills building) teleconference work each week.  In addition, there are other tasks: a brief observer report to fill out and send in after each small group meeting, short reading assignments and resource reviews, and occasional required responses to questions posted in the learning forum on the on-line training site.  Practicing coaching with clients, friends and/or family members is critical to growing strong coaching skills.  Many students find that listening to the class or small group recordings for a second time is useful. Reviewing your own small group coaching after receiving trainer feedback is particularly useful.

Q:  Can I speak with someone who has completed the training?

A:  Yes, several of our students have offered to be available for these kinds of inquiries.  You can find a link to their email addresses on the Testimonial page and make arrangements to speak to them.

Q:  Can I see the training material before enrolling?

A:  No.  The content of each course is described on the Courses page.  If you want to know more please email or call with your questions.

 

Applying for the Training

Q:  How much organizing experience do I need to apply for the training?  

A:  We are looking for students who have a “comfort and competence” with organizing techniques and with basic organizer-client dynamics.  We think that takes about two years, but are aware that some organizers gain very little confidence or actual client experience in the early years of their businesses, and others organizers come to this work with very relevant work (or life) experiences or specific organizing training which might take them to a place of comfort and competence much earlier. 

A student who has completed the Coach Approach for Organizers™ training and is applying for certification will also need to document what makes her an experienced organizer.

Q:  Do I have to be a member of NAPO, POC or ICD to apply? 

A:  No.  NAPO, POC and ICD memberships are not necessary.  Members of these organizations who take advantage of training and conference opportunities will gain important learning which an isolated organizer would not.  If you have questions about your readiness for this work, contact Denslow to talk it over. 

 

Training Costs     

Q:  What payment plan options do you offer?

A.  See Training Payment Options page.

Q:  Is the practicum fee in addition to the coursework?  I saw the breakdown but am a little confused.

A:  The practicum fee is not a graduation fee.  It's the cost of the post-graduate Organizer Coach Practicum course.  The Foundation Courses deal primarily with coaching skills and our coaching models, and personal and professional awareness -- the focus is on your ability to work with clients. 

We designed the Organizer Coach Practicum course for students who are pursuing a coaching credential. Its focus is on developing a personal coaching identity, connecting to the field of coaching, and gaining a coaching perspective that contrasts with the Coach Approach model. In the practicum course you will continue to strengthen your coaching skills and learn more about coaching applications.

Q:  Do you offer scholarships or tuition assistance?

A:  We don’t.  I hope we will be able to at some point.  We have occasionally made successful intern or barter arrangements with students for tuition when our needs match a prospective student’s skills.

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Training Completion & Continuing Educations Credits

Q:  May I call myself a coach after taking the Coaching Essentials class? 

A:  Each professional makes their own decisions about this in accordance with their understanding of the Codes of Ethics for the fields in which they work.  Organizing and coaching industry ethical standards require that you represent your training and competence honestly.  I offer the following suggestions, standing as I do with a foot in each world.

Most coach training programs encourage even brand new students to tell people they have entered coaching training and/or are a student coach or a new coach.  Stepping right into this new work and letting people know you are developing these skills is as important to your emerging identity as a coach as it is to your business – to start to get the word out.  Practicing coaching on friends, family or willing clients is a traditional part of the journey to coaching competence. 

After taking the Coaching Essentials course it's appropriate to claim any of the following:

  • I have some coaching skills training   
  • I have successfully completed a basic, two-month coaching skills training course 
  • I use coaching skills in my organizing work
  • I provide coaching support to my clients to complement the organizing process in these ways: to gain clarity, set goals, develop habits and accountability, etc.
  • I am a new coach or a beginning coach

Once you are using coaching skills in your organizing work with success and comfort, you could refer to yourself as an organizer coach, a coaching organizer or coach-organizer.

Again, these are your decisions, but these recommendations seem to fit organizers who have completed the Coaching Essentials training.

Q:  May I call myself a coach after graduating from the foundation training? 

A:   After successfully completing the four Coach Approach for Organizers™ Foundation Courses, I think it would be appropriate to claim any variation of the following:

  • I have graduated from a year-long coaching skills training course
  • I have been trained in the fundamentals of both Life and ADD Coaching Skills
  • I am a graduate of a comprehensive organizer coach training program
  • I am a graduate of the Coach Approach for Organizers coach training program
  • I am a coach or an organizer coach

If you have significant, previous training in ADHD or some other coaching you might, of course, make stronger statements than these. 

Once an organizer completes the Organizer Coach Practicum and successfully meets the requirements in the Certified Organizer Coach™ credentialing process, then s/he can, of course, refer to herself as a Certified Organizer Coach which is designed as an ACC-equivalent credential. 

We also offer three certifications, which are at the PCC-level: Certified ADHD Organizer Coach, Professional Certified Organizer Coach, and Certified Productivity Leadership Coach

Again, referring to oneself as a coach with any of these four coaching credentials would certainly be accurate and appropriate.

Q:  How many of the Coach Approach for Organizers™ training hours count toward my ICD or BCPO recertification requirements? 

A:  In our experience with both of these programs, all of the Coach Approach for Organizers™ training hours would count for either of them.  However, the final word on this is the prerogative of those programs. 

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Q: How many of the training hours count for ICF (International Coach Federation) or ADD coach credentialing?  Are the training hours pre-approved or accredited? 

A:  Early in 2015, we were recognized by the International Coaching Federation (ICF) as an Accredited Coach Training Program (ACTP). We were pleased that every minute of coach training we had created was approved, signifying the arrival of the distinct specialty of organizer coaching in the field of coaching. Our training is also compatible with the requirements for ADHD coaching credentials and a majority of our coach-trainers have ADHD coaching specialties.

As new courses are established, it is sent to ICF to be folded into our ACTP approval. (ICF requires a course be taught before submission.) Approval, when it comes, is retroactive. 

Any course we teach can be used for coaching credit because we teach to the core competencies, have credentialed trainers, etc. Our training was approved by ICF because we exceed ICF’s training standards. No Coach Approach course was ever rejected by ICF on a coach’s application.

Our confidence in our training is confirmed by our students’ competence.  Half of the applicants for the COC credential are evaluated in their oral assessments at a Professional Certified Coach (PCC) level, a credential that requires more than twice the training. 

 

Ask me any question about the training or about coaching and organizing! I've opened up several 15-minute appointment times you can schedule yourself into.

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